Victoria, Young Head St. George Sovereign

On offer here is the Victoria Young Head St. George Sovereign. The coins are all selected and many are well above average. All coins are original and genuine and were struck in 22ct (916 2/3rd fine gold).
Availability: In stock
SKU: CVV4107
£375.00
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George VI, Rare Penny Fine, 1950

The two lowest mintages of the old Penny coin were struck in 1950 and 1951 during the reign of King George VI. In 1950 they only made 240,000 coins that means for £1000 you could have bought all the 1950 Pennies they ever made. Until very recently numismatists have always thought that all the 1950 Pennies were shipped to Bermuda for use after World War II. Now we know that this information is wrong. They were also sent to the Bahamas in the West Indies. How do we know? Because a good friend went to the Bahamas 50 years ago and advertised in the newspapers to buy these coins. For the past 50 years these coins have lain in his safe deposit box untouched. Now these coins were actually used in circulation, because after the War there was a great shortage of small change. The island has a very salty atmosphere and thus the coins are very scarce in the higher grades. The coins on offer are in Fine and Very Fine condition and remember they only struck a total of 240,000 1950 Pennies for circulation. Most collections are missing this date of King George VI Penny, but now you can change all that. Now you can add a Key Date 1950 Penny to your collection, while this Bahamas Hoard lasts. But there are far more collectors who want this coin than there are coins to satisfy those needs. You have been warned….
£19.50

Victoria, Gothic Florin Fair

The first British decimal coin was the Florin or Two Shillings which today is the 10p. First issued in 1849 and changed to the Gothic design in 1851 these florins were struck in Sterling Silver. You have a crowned portrait of Queen Victoria facing left on the obverse and four crowned coats of arms on the reverse. The strangest thing is that a large part of the population was illiterate, yet instead of putting the date in what is known today as Arabic numerals, they put the date in Roman numerals. So that a large part of the populace could not even read the date that was on the coin. As 1851 became MDCCCLI. The coins on offer have seen considerable circulation, but don’t forget that even the most modern of the coins is today 132 years old. We have made sure that you can make out the date, even if only the last digits are clear.
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Edward VII, Shilling, 1907

Edward VII’s reign was very short, as he had to wait for his Mother, Queen Victoria, to pass before he could become King. Coins for this Monarch were only issued from 1902-1910. This issue we can offer the 1907 Shilling. The Shilling was of course given to individuals when they joined the Services. You were said to take the King’s Shilling. The 1907 Shilling is in Very Good – Fine condition and struck in Sterling Silver, which is the finest silver that a coin actually meant to be used were struck in.
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