Penny

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1918 KN Penny, Kings Norton Mint

In the reign of King George V the Royal Mint ran out of capacity to strike enough coins for everyday usage, so they contracted out the minting of some Pennies. One of the two Mints they used was the King’s Norton Mint, unlike the Birmingham Mint, the King’s Norton Mint had never struck coins for them before. They only made pennies for the Mint in 1918 and 1919 and all of these coins carry the ‘KN’ mint mark by the left of the date. Of the two mints, the King’s Norton is by far the most difficult to get. We have a nice little group of the 1918 issue in Fine condition. Remember these KN Pennies were only ever struck for two years.
£14.95

Edward I, Treasure 1d Bristol Very Good

The hoard of Edward I Silver Pennies was found at Montrave, Fifeshire in Scotland in 1877. It was found on the land belonging to Mr. Allan Gilmour of Lundin and Montrave. It was fully declared and sat in the British Museum for 40-50 years while they examined it. We bought a large part of the hoard from one of the heirs of the man who found them in 1877. We are offering you the chance on the Rarer Mints. They are priced right to make you happy, and if you come from one of these places, so much the better. Each coin comes with a certificate certifying that your coin comes from the Montrave Treasure Hoard and which town it was minted in. Of course the Key coin is from Berwick-on-Tweed. Here we present the coin Minted in Bristol.
£89.50

2 Worn Victorian Pennies

We've just found two dates of Victorian bronze pennies dated 1890 and 1891. They are worn and circulated, but they are over 125 years old and have seen a lot of life. It is not the sort of coins that we would normally offer, but we felt making the price reasonable enough, would attract collectors. The dates show but the coins are worn. On the other hand you can have both the 1890 and the 1891 Queen Victoria Young Head bronze pennies for a special price.
£3.50

George V Penny 1936 Brilliant Uncirculated

This King George V Penny was issued 83 years ago in 1936, but it has a most interesting history. In 1936 we had three Kings, George V died, Edward VIII became King, although he never had a Coronation and finally his brother became George VI. But the real secret is that most of the coins with the portrait of King George V were actually struck while Edward VIII was on the throne. We bought a fantastic little hoard of these the largest bronze coin issued at the time. The coins are in Brilliant Uncirculated condition, which considering they are 83 years old is quite fantastic. Add that into the history of 1936 and you have a heck of wonderful coin. The condition is top quality and the history is amazing, but supplies are limited.
£38.00

Rare 1950 Penny Fine

The two lowest mintages of the old Penny coin were struck in 1950 and 1951 during the reign of King George VI. In 1950 they only made 240,000 coins that means for £1000 you could have bought all the 1950 Pennies they ever made. Until very recently numismatists have always thought that all the 1950 Pennies were shipped to Bermuda for use after World War II. Now we know that this information is wrong. They were also sent to the Bahamas in the West Indies. How do we know? Because a good friend went to the Bahamas 50 years ago and advertised in the newspapers to buy these coins. For the past 50 years these coins have lain in his safe deposit box untouched. Now these coins were actually used in circulation, because after the War there was a great shortage of small change. The island has a very salty atmosphere and thus the coins are very scarce in the higher grades. The coins on offer are in Fine and Very Fine condition and remember they only struck a total of 240,000 1950 Pennies for circulation. Most collections are missing this date of King George VI Penny, but now you can change all that. Now you can add a Key Date 1950 Penny to your collection, while this Bahamas Hoard lasts. But there are far more collectors who want this coin than there are coins to satisfy those needs. You have been warned….
£19.50

Edward VIII British West Africa 1936H Penny

Although no coins of King Edward VIII were released in this country, due to his Abdication, they did strike some coins for the overseas Colonies. British West Africa had three different denominations struck and that were actually used as day to day money. They are the Penny, Halfpenny and Tenth Penny, all were struck with holes in the middle, as the locals had no pockets and the hole allowed them to be stuck on a string that they could then wear. Not only were there three denominations, but they were struck at three different Mints, some of which are scarce. Offered here is the Heaton 1d in uncirculated.
£10.00