George VI, English Shilling Gem Uncirculated, 1949

It was in the reign of King George VI that all silver was removed from our coinage and replaced with what we use today, cupronickel. But what many collectors don’t realise is that the cupronickel coins of George VI in choice condition are much rarer to get than choice silver coins of George VI. We purchased a group of the 1949 English Shillings, put away in 1949 and are they super! We have classed them Choice Uncirculated and Gem Uncirculated, the worst coin is far superior to what you see on the market and the finest coins are just about as good as you will ever see. The current catalogue price on this coin is £35.00 in just Uncirculated condition and all of these are much nicer than that. A chance to buy a Choice George VI 1949 English cupronickel Shilling at a price that will please you…
Availability: In stock
SKU: USH49EX
£35.00
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George VI, English Shilling, 1950 Uncirculated

King George VI died in 1952 and no Shillings were issued that year, although a Proof example did sell for about £35,000. We can offer the penultimate George VI Shilling, the 1950 Shilling with the English reverse. This is not an easy coin to find in the higher grades and we can offer it in Uncirculated and Choice Uncirculated condition. You have the bare head of the King on one side and a lion standing on a crown on the other side. They catalogue £35.00 in Uncirculated condition in the latest catalogue. Choice Uncirculated would of course be more difficult and more expensive, as they are rarer. If you want one, please get in there quickly…
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Elizabeth II, 10 pence Uncirculated, 1968

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Elizabeth II, 20 Pence Piedfort, 1982

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