George III, Bull Head Shilling Fair (1816-1820)

In 1816 they passed the Currency Reform Act which made it possible to strike coins without having to have the Monarch sign a bill every year. This was because of King George III's sickness, which resulted in a great shortage of small coins. In 1816 and until 1820 this new design of the King’s Shilling circulated and the King hated the new designs. In fact he hated the Half Crown design so much that he made them change it. All of the George III Shillings are struck in Sterling Silver and they were only made from 1816 until 1820. We can offer this Bull Head Shilling of George III in Fair. The King may have hated the design, but we like it. The more coins you order, the more different dates we will try and give you.
Availability: In stock
SKU: CGE5303
£12.95
Customers who bought this item also bought

Gallienus Centaur Coin

Gallienus ruled as sole emperor from A.D. 260-268 during one of the most difficult times in the history of the empire. Not only was the empire facing natural disasters and invasions on all sides but he had to face at least eight rebellions from his own governors and generals! He issued a fantastic group of bronze Antoniniani coins to honour the Gods, asking for their protection against these troubles. Though made in Europe, these coins were used in Britain and are a large part of the Mildenhall Hoard in the British Museum. Depicted on these coins are a variety of animals, some real and some mythical, each linked to one of the Roman deities. This series is known as the 'Gallienus Zoo Coins' and make a great set to try to complete. The first we offer from this series is of the Centaur, either holding a rudder and globe or hunting with a bow. These are designed to honour Apollo, likely in response to plagues and disease. The coins are at least Very Fine but because of the chaos at the time remember they may be a little weakly struck. As always the first to order will get the best. At this price they will sell fast.
£24.50

George VI, Both Coronation Threepences, 1937

In 1937 George VI was finally crowned. The Royal Mint issued a new coin that year the brass threepence, but they also continued to make a silver threepence. We have pairs of both 1937 Coronation threepences to offer you. The coins are in circulated condition, that means that they were actually used, unlike some of today’s coins which are made only for collectors and none actually circulate. You get the 1937 silver threepence and the ‘new’ 1937 brass threepence, the first year of issue of a totally new coin.
£9.50

Type Set of British Pennies

Includes the old large bronze Pennies of Queen Victoria, Edward VII, George V, George VI and Queen Elizabeth II. In September 2015 Queen Elizabeth II replaced Queen Victoria as our longest serving Monarch. The bronze Penny was first issued under Queen Victoria and was last issued under Queen Elizabeth II. One marketing company is charging £19.99 for the set and The Royal Mint is charging £22.00 in a cardboard holder. Get all five Pennies one of each Monarch for just £7.50. How do we do it? We are coin dealers with the largest inventory in the United Kingdom. We work on a mark-up, not on a dream price. At Coincraft you get good value for your money.
£7.50