George III BH Sixpence Very Good

In 1816 there was the Currency Reform Act, which allowed coins to be struck even without the Monarch’s permission. This was put into place because of King George III’s illness and the shortage of small change. From 1816 on, new designs, new weights new everything. These are the first of the new Sterling Silver Sixpences issued from 1816-1820. You have the bull head of the King on one side and a crowned shield on the other side. Even in this grade supplies are limited.
Availability: In stock
SKU: CGE5405
£29.50
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