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Edward VII, Silver Coronation Medallion, 1902 EF

Issued by the Royal Mint in 1902 to commemorate the King's Coronation. Matt Proof Sterling Silver.
Availability: Out of stock
SKU: NEG8807
£49.50

Queen Victoria’s son, Edward VII, had to wait a long time to become King, not unlike our Prince Charles. But it almost didn’t happen. Just before the Coronation he had appendicitis which, in those days, you died from. They preformed a ‘new’ operation and he lived and the Coronation happened, only slightly postponed.
This is the Official Silver Coronation medal issued by the Royal Mint to honour that event in 1902, some 115 years ago. You have the crowned bust of King Edward VII on one side and his Queen Alexandra on the other side.
These are struck in Matt Proof Sterling Silver, the only year this finish was used. Beautiful silver medallions which are getting harder and harder to find. The medals offered are Extremely Fine condition and 115 years old.

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