Choice Antoninianus of Probus

Probus became emperor in AD 276 after overthrowing the emperor Florianus. A native of the city of Sirmium in what is now Serbia, he rose to prominence and proved himself a capable administrator and commander and is recognised as an emperor who contributed to the revival of the Roman Empire at a time of severe turmoil and crisis. In AD 277/8 his armies defeated the Goths, Alamanni, Longiones, Franks, and Burgundians. He realised that the best way to keep his soldiers out of trouble was to keep them busy so, with the frontiers of the empire stabilised, he set his men to the task of rebuilding the shattered infrastructure of key provinces that had crumbled under previous emperors by building roads, bridges and fortifications, draining marshes, digging canals and, interestingly, planting extensive vineyards. New plantations sprang up across Europe and there is mention in some records of Probus authorising the planting of vineyards in Britain too so we may still be enjoying the fruits of his labours today! These Antoninianus, or ‘Ants’ as we call them, are as good as they come, virtually as struck and with original lustre. There are a variety of reverse types most with standing figures but a limited number available in this grade.
Availability: In stock
SKU: ARC1020
£59.50
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Picture of Gallienus Gazelle Bronze Antoninianus Very Fine

Gallienus Gazelle Bronze Antoninianus Very Fine

Gallienus ruled as sole emperor from A.D. 260-268 during one of the most difficult times in the history of the empire. Not only was the empire facing natural disasters and invasions on all sides but he had to face at least eight rebellions from his own governors and generals! He issued a fantastic group of bronze Antoninianus coins to honour the Gods, asking for their protection against these troubles. Though made in Europe, these coins were used in Britain and are a large part of the Mildenhall Hoard in the British Museum. Depicted on these coins are a variety of animals, some real and some mythical, each linked to one of the Roman deities. This series is known as the 'Gallienus Zoo Coins' and make a great set to try to complete. From this series, we offer here the Gazelle, identified as different to the antelope by the numbers ‘XI’ or ‘XII’ underneath and the straight horns. These are designed to honour Diana, the sister of Apollo and the goddess of the hunt. This is likely to bring luck to hunting and like her brother, for plagues and disease. The coins are at least Very Fine but because of the chaos at the time remember they may be a little weakly struck. As always the first to order will get the best. This is the last to complete the set we have available!
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Picture of Constantinople Comm (Almost Extremely Fine)

Constantinople Comm (Almost Extremely Fine)

This is one of a handful of very interesting commemorative issues struck by Constantine the Great. The type offered here is one of the two more affordable types and was made for the founding of Constantinople in A.D. 330. They are made from bronze and show the Goddess of the city, ‘Constantinopolis’, in a helmet and war gear on the obverse. The reverse shows the goddess of Victory on the prow of a ship holding a sceptre and shield. This is to symbolise the port being captured using ships by Constantine’s son, Crispus. On a small amount of these reverses, the prow will be facing towards Victory, this is because the engravers making the designs didn’t realise the goddess was meant to be on the ship! There are enough variations in mintmarks and the styles of the designs on these to form a collection of these types alone. But the most interesting about these coins is how well they have survived! At this time bronze coins would circulate so heavily that it is very hard to find them in a good grade. We have a small collection of this commemorative from 1600 years ago in this exceptional almost Extremely Fine grade.
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Picture of Gordian III Billon Silver Antoninianus  AEF

Gordian III Billon Silver Antoninianus AEF

Gordian III had a rather good claim to the Imperial Throne, being closely related to no less than two previous senatorial emperors! He was the grandson of Gordian I, and the nephew of Gordian II, who declared themselves emperors in A.D. 238 from Carthage. They were in opposition to Maximinus Thrax but both were defeated by his loyal governor and died after a joint reign of just 21 days. The Roman Senate then appointed Balbinus and Pupienus as joint emperors; they immediately gave Gordian III the rank of Caesar to try to legitimise their own reign. Luckily for them while this was happening Maximinus was killed by his own men. But, after just a few months, both Balbinus and Pupienus were themselves murdered by the Praetorian Guard. Gordian III was then proclaimed sole emperor and thus emerged from the turbulent events of A.D. 238 as sole ruler of the mighty Roman Empire, all at the age of thirteen! Very little is recorded of the events of Gordian’s six-year reign, which in ancient writings is usually a sign of peace and prosperity. In A.D. 242, he led an initially successful campaign against the Persians. But in A.D. 244, he was murdered following a plot led by the Praetorian Prefect who seized the throne and reigned as Philip I. The coins we offer here are billon silver Antoninianus showing Gordian III’s portrait on the obverse and various reverses. The grade of the coins is About Extremely Fine and as always with the Crisis of the Third Century, a minority will have weaker sections. As always, the first to order will get the best
£59.50